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Discussion Starter #1
my o rings keep going bad on my cyls.I change them and two weeks later their gone again. I have 8 inch rev flows on a 99 civic. the o rings dont look bad when i change them just scratched a little
 

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try honing the inside of the cylinder... sometimes when the cylinder walls aren't honed well enough, they tend to eat up seals...
 

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what kind of o-rings are you using, try using square o-rings, there called "square" because their flat and not round like the regular ones
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Originally posted by vegashopper@Dec 18 2003, 11:58 AM
try honing the inside of the cylinder... sometimes when the cylinder walls aren't honed well enough, they tend to eat up seals...
what is honing
 

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Originally posted by KILO@Dec 18 2003, 12:14 PM
what kind of o-rings are you using, try using square o-rings, there called "square" because their flat and not round like the regular ones
im using the prohopper rebuilds it comes with 2 rounds and 1 flat per cyl
 

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Originally posted by 3wheelincivic+Dec 18 2003, 03:13 PM--></span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (3wheelincivic @ Dec 18 2003, 03:13 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteBegin--KILO@Dec 18 2003, 12:14 PM
what kind of o-rings are you using, try using square o-rings, there called "square" because their flat and not round like the regular ones
im using the prohopper rebuilds it comes with 2 rounds and 1 flat per cyl[/b][/quote]
He's talking about "u-cup" rings. They definitely seal a lot better than regular o-rings and it's all I'll use.

Honing a cylinder basically means to smooth out the inner walls of your cylinder casing. If you've been roughly jabbing the shaft back in the casing after changing an o-ring, you can scratch the inner walls. Those scratches, in turn, cut up orings. In honing the casing, those minute scratches are just "sanded" smooth.

If you decide to get new cylinders, I'd suggest going with regular cylinders. I have a 4-strut car and I have regular cylinders. Sure they're mounted upside down and the hose comes out of the bottoms, but just deal with that in your routing. The problem with reverse-flows is that since the entire shaft has a "hole" running down the center of it, the shaft flexes more. This flexing, especially on a FWD, strut-car can also cause the shaft the scratch the inner walls of the casing.

Just something else to think about while you're looking.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Originally posted by BOUNCIN89MERC2LOW97LHS+Dec 18 2003, 02:39 PM--></span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (BOUNCIN89MERC2LOW97LHS @ Dec 18 2003, 02:39 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>
Originally posted by [email protected] 18 2003, 03:13 PM
<!--QuoteBegin--KILO
@Dec 18 2003, 12:14 PM
what kind of o-rings are you using, try using square o-rings, there called "square" because their flat and not round like the regular ones

im using the prohopper rebuilds it comes with 2 rounds and 1 flat per cyl
He's talking about "u-cup" rings. They definitely seal a lot better than regular o-rings and it's all I'll use.

Honing a cylinder basically means to smooth out the inner walls of your cylinder casing. If you've been roughly jabbing the shaft back in the casing after changing an o-ring, you can scratch the inner walls. Those scratches, in turn, cut up orings. In honing the casing, those minute scratches are just "sanded" smooth.

If you decide to get new cylinders, I'd suggest going with regular cylinders. I have a 4-strut car and I have regular cylinders. Sure they're mounted upside down and the hose comes out of the bottoms, but just deal with that in your routing. The problem with reverse-flows is that since the entire shaft has a "hole" running down the center of it, the shaft flexes more. This flexing, especially on a FWD, strut-car can also cause the shaft the scratch the inner walls of the casing.

Just something else to think about while you're looking.[/b][/quote]
how do i hon or do the honing thing
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Originally posted by BOUNCIN89MERC2LOW97LHS+Dec 18 2003, 02:39 PM--></span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (BOUNCIN89MERC2LOW97LHS @ Dec 18 2003, 02:39 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>
Originally posted by [email protected] 18 2003, 03:13 PM
<!--QuoteBegin--KILO
@Dec 18 2003, 12:14 PM
what kind of o-rings are you using, try using square o-rings, there called "square" because their flat and not round like the regular ones

im using the prohopper rebuilds it comes with 2 rounds and 1 flat per cyl
He's talking about "u-cup" rings. They definitely seal a lot better than regular o-rings and it's all I'll use.

Honing a cylinder basically means to smooth out the inner walls of your cylinder casing. If you've been roughly jabbing the shaft back in the casing after changing an o-ring, you can scratch the inner walls. Those scratches, in turn, cut up orings. In honing the casing, those minute scratches are just "sanded" smooth.

If you decide to get new cylinders, I'd suggest going with regular cylinders. I have a 4-strut car and I have regular cylinders. Sure they're mounted upside down and the hose comes out of the bottoms, but just deal with that in your routing. The problem with reverse-flows is that since the entire shaft has a "hole" running down the center of it, the shaft flexes more. This flexing, especially on a FWD, strut-car can also cause the shaft the scratch the inner walls of the casing.

Just something else to think about while you're looking.[/b][/quote]
u said when i change o rings i might be damaging them. when i put the shaft back in i hit it in with a hammer because its hard to get it in with new o rings. what is the correct way
 

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when u put juice on a honda the cylinders are constantly turning, causing xtra wear on the seals, you usually have to change them every other month, depending on how much you hit the switches, but two weeks seems a little soon to be changing them
 
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the cylinders don't move at on a honda. The strut does not move like it does on Mcpherson strut cars. The wishbone is bolted down, so the cylinders don't move at all.

I have had leak problems with prohopper reverse flows. Eventually I just bought a new pair and everything was ok. The o-rings looked perfect, even though they were leaking like crazy. There is an o-ring inside the bushing of reverse flows that fucked up on several of mine. Prohopper said there were none in the bushing, but they were flattening out between the bushing and the stroke.



Last edited by [email protected] at Dec 18 2003, 09:54 PM
 

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Originally posted by 3wheelincivic@Dec 18 2003, 06:16 PM
how do i hon or do the honing thing
Well, "honing" something is definitely not a do-it-yourself thing unless you have a shop or something. You're basically removing a small amount of metal from the inside wall of the casing and that's not something you can just "eyeball."
 

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Originally posted by 3wheelincivic@Dec 18 2003, 06:27 PM
u said when i change o rings i might be damaging them. when i put the shaft back in i hit it in with a hammer because its hard to get it in with new o rings. what is the correct way
Well, yeah. Everytime you hit that shaft with the hammer the shaft is probably scratching the inside of the casing; and it could also be scoring your o-rings. They shouldn't be that hard to put it. Yes, it takes some force, but not beating 'em with a hammer.
Sounds like you're trying to put the shaft back in without dumping the system. You need to hold your dump down while putting the shaft in so that you can slide it in there easier and not be fighting a dump valve.
 

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Originally posted by newmovementrider@Dec 18 2003, 09:36 PM
when u put juice on a honda the cylinders are constantly turning, causing xtra wear on the seals, you usually have to change them every other month, depending on how much you hit the switches, but two weeks seems a little soon to be changing them
I keep hearing that but cylinders are designed to be self-lubricating so that they can extend, retract AND turn; that's why they're round. I think people having that problem have other issues that need to be addressed if they're changing o-rings every two months. My cylinders also turn when turning and I (by choice) only change cylinder o-rings every 12 months.
 

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Originally posted by BOUNCIN89MERC2LOW97LHS+Dec 19 2003, 12:16 PM--></span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (BOUNCIN89MERC2LOW97LHS @ Dec 19 2003, 12:16 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteBegin--newmovementrider@Dec 18 2003, 09:36 PM
when u put juice on a honda the cylinders are constantly turning, causing xtra wear on the seals, you usually have to change them every other month, depending on how much you hit the switches, but two weeks seems a little soon to be changing them
I keep hearing that but cylinders are designed to be self-lubricating so that they can extend, retract AND turn; that's why they're round. I think people having that problem have other issues that need to be addressed if they're changing o-rings every two months. My cylinders also turn when turning and I (by choice) only change cylinder o-rings every 12 months.[/b][/quote]
Hey bouncin can you post a picture of the u cup o-rings you use and were you do get them. ;) :)
 

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Originally posted by Big Baller 82cutlass+Dec 19 2003, 02:01 PM--></span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (Big Baller 82cutlass @ Dec 19 2003, 02:01 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>
Originally posted by [email protected] 19 2003, 12:16 PM
<!--QuoteBegin--newmovementrider
@Dec 18 2003, 09:36 PM
when u put juice on a honda the cylinders are constantly turning, causing xtra wear on the seals, you usually have to change them every other month, depending on how much you hit the switches, but two weeks seems a little soon to be changing them

I keep hearing that but cylinders are designed to be self-lubricating so that they can extend, retract AND turn; that's why they're round. I think people having that problem have other issues that need to be addressed if they're changing o-rings every two months. My cylinders also turn when turning and I (by choice) only change cylinder o-rings every 12 months.
Hey bouncin can you post a picture of the u cup o-rings you use and were you do get them. ;) :)[/b][/quote]
This page http://www.infodotinc.com/basae/80.htm has an illustration of u-cups and quads (x's, squares) at the bottom of it. You may like the look of the quads. I tried them once but the double seal of the "X" equated to 2 "tiny" orings. In theory it sounded good, but I had a problem 'cause they just weren't strong enough and leaked after long drives (6+ hours). But hey, that was me. You might want to give those a shot too.

As far as where to get them, just check your yellow pages for your local "hydraulics, industrial supply" house. They'll take care of you. :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Originally posted by BOUNCIN89MERC2LOW97LHS+Dec 19 2003, 11:16 AM--></span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (BOUNCIN89MERC2LOW97LHS @ Dec 19 2003, 11:16 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteBegin--newmovementrider@Dec 18 2003, 09:36 PM
when u put juice on a honda the cylinders are constantly turning, causing xtra wear on the seals, you usually have to change them every other month, depending on how much you hit the switches, but two weeks seems a little soon to be changing them
I keep hearing that but cylinders are designed to be self-lubricating so that they can extend, retract AND turn; that's why they're round. I think people having that problem have other issues that need to be addressed if they're changing o-rings every two months. My cylinders also turn when turning and I (by choice) only change cylinder o-rings every 12 months.[/b][/quote]
my cyls dont move when i turn
 

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Originally posted by BOUNCIN89MERC2LOW97LHS+Dec 19 2003, 11:05 AM--></span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (BOUNCIN89MERC2LOW97LHS @ Dec 19 2003, 11:05 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteBegin--3wheelincivic@Dec 18 2003, 06:27 PM
u said when i change o rings i might be damaging them. when i put the shaft back in i hit it in with a hammer because its hard to get it in with new o rings. what is the correct way
Well, yeah. Everytime you hit that shaft with the hammer the shaft is probably scratching the inside of the casing; and it could also be scoring your o-rings. They shouldn't be that hard to put it. Yes, it takes some force, but not beating 'em with a hammer.
Sounds like you're trying to put the shaft back in without dumping the system. You need to hold your dump down while putting the shaft in so that you can slide it in there easier and not be fighting a dump valve.[/b][/quote]
i take my cyls off the car when i change the o rings
 

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Originally posted by 3wheelincivic+Dec 22 2003, 11:51 AM--></span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (3wheelincivic @ Dec 22 2003, 11:51 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>
Originally posted by [email protected] 19 2003, 11:05 AM
<!--QuoteBegin--3wheelincivic
@Dec 18 2003, 06:27 PM
u said when i change o rings i might be damaging them. when i put the shaft back in i hit it in with a hammer because its hard to get it in with new o rings. what is the correct way

Well, yeah. Everytime you hit that shaft with the hammer the shaft is probably scratching the inside of the casing; and it could also be scoring your o-rings. They shouldn't be that hard to put it. Yes, it takes some force, but not beating 'em with a hammer.
Sounds like you're trying to put the shaft back in without dumping the system. You need to hold your dump down while putting the shaft in so that you can slide it in there easier and not be fighting a dump valve.
i take my cyls off the car when i change the o rings[/b][/quote]
OK, well you need to try 'pressing' the shaft back in the casing. (although it shouldn't be THAT hard.) Either way, beating it with a hammer is not a good idea.
 
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