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like the topic says i finally decided im going to get some hydraulics, one step at a time, first step is to learn everything i possibly can, i think iv learned alot hangin around this site the past year but theres still a few questions i need to know...

for a pump, what difference does pumphead make? and then theres the motor inside the pump i think? (bare with me i never even seen a setup in real life :( ) how many parts are there to a pump and what does what? (i looked in the tech section and could not find this)

i know soleniods go with the batteries but what really are they? like what function do they serve

and if im going to get a setup what are the normal techincal problems associated with it , i know people talk about there dumps leak , cylinders leak, soleniods fry,

im gonna save up money and try to just get a 1 pump 2 dump setup and like 2 batteries lol, just to do f/b to learn off of is this a good idea? i would like to piece together my own system so that way i know what does what and understand whats going on , is this a good idea? alright, thanks homies :cool:
 

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Hey I think its great that you want to get your switches now. but im gonna tell you sometimes saving $10 upfront will cost you $500 later. You can do F/B with one pump and 2 dumps but your going to have to buy y blocks (thats extra) and unless you hide them its going to look weird (to me anyway) piecing together a setup is not the way I would go if I was you the hydraulic companies have some good prices on two pump setups. By time you get every thing you need for F/B the only thing your missing to get the extra 8 switches is the other pump. Sometimes less is not more. Dont take this a an attack just trying to help you were all in the same game. I would be happy to explain all the parts of a 2 pump set up to just let me know. George SRS Hydraulics :)
 

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dayum over 70 views and only 1 reply :uh:

thanks homie, most people i talked to say to wait for the cash to buy a complete system also, what ever happend to that all american hydraulics kit it was like 800 i think and came with 2 pumps... that looked like a good one

but yea i did have some questions ... what are all the pieces to a pump and whats the difference between motors + gears and all that good stuff, can u upgrade them and make a pump more efficent or something?? thanks :cool:
 

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As ghost211 put it to save $10 now is going to cost you later. By time you buy all the fitting to make one pump do it all you would only saved a few dollars anyways. Go with a 2 pump setup. Start with 4 batterys. This are about $25 a piece for Interstate. And now to answer a few questions in your post...

Pumps- The difference in pumphead sizes are the amount of fluid that they can move. Pumps consist of the following parts: Motor- turns the pump, Pumphead- moves the fluid, Resevoir- stores and collects the fluid. Block- holds all the parts together and directs the fluid. Attached to the pump assemble you have other parts depending on setup. Main components are fittings, dumps- releases the pressue to the cylinders, checkvalves- allows the fluid to only move in one direction, slow downs- to control the speed of how fast the car drops, and y-block(used on one dump setups, such as hopper)- takes the output for one cylinder and makes it into two . A pump with two dumps can control two cylinders down motion. You will have to pump up both (say front) cylinders then the dumps can control which side you want to go down.

Solenoids- They take the sudden power spike when you hit the switch and delivers it to the pump. It can handle a lot higher voltage than the switch and that is why it is needed. Also, serves as the power interupt to the pump until you hit the switch otherwise your pump would run constantly.

With a basic setup your technical problems are going to be at a minimum. Solenoids go out from to much power for the amount of them or poor grounds. Leaks occur from improper tighting, no teflon tape on fittings, or blowing seals from pressure.

You got a lot to learn, but these are the basics of what compents are used. Installing and learning the placements are another story. Save up your money and do it right the first time. Hell if your anywhere close to where I live drive on over and I would be glad help you out. For $800 to a G you should be sitting good and have all you need.
 

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Originally posted by Dvlshtndcy@Sep 17 2003, 08:24 AM
As ghost211 put it to save $10 now is going to cost you later. By time you buy all the fitting to make one pump do it all you would only saved a few dollars anyways. Go with a 2 pump setup. Start with 4 batterys. This are about $25 a piece for Interstate. And now to answer a few questions in your post...

Pumps- The difference in pumphead sizes are the amount of fluid that they can move. Pumps consist of the following parts: Motor- turns the pump, Pumphead- moves the fluid, Resevoir- stores and collects the fluid. Block- holds all the parts together and directs the fluid. Attached to the pump assemble you have other parts depending on setup. Main components are fittings, dumps- releases the pressue to the cylinders, checkvalves- allows the fluid to only move in one direction, slow downs- to control the speed of how fast the car drops, and y-block(used on one dump setups, such as hopper)- takes the output for one cylinder and makes it into two . A pump with two dumps can control two cylinders down motion. You will have to pump up both (say front) cylinders then the dumps can control which side you want to go down.

Solenoids- They take the sudden power spike when you hit the switch and delivers it to the pump. It can handle a lot higher voltage than the switch and that is why it is needed. Also, serves as the power interupt to the pump until you hit the switch otherwise your pump would run constantly.

With a basic setup your technical problems are going to be at a minimum. Solenoids go out from to much power for the amount of them or poor grounds. Leaks occur from improper tighting, no teflon tape on fittings, or blowing seals from pressure.

You got a lot to learn, but these are the basics of what compents are used. Installing and learning the placements are another story. Save up your money and do it right the first time. Hell if your anywhere close to where I live drive on over and I would be glad help you out. For $800 to a G you should be sitting good and have all you need.
where do you buy battery's for $25? everywhere i go there like $60 to $100
 

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Originally posted by $outh$ider+Sep 19 2003, 12:14 AM--></span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE ($outh$ider @ Sep 19 2003, 12:14 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteBegin--Dvlshtndcy@Sep 17 2003, 08:24 AM
As ghost211 put it to save $10 now is going to cost you later. By time you buy all the fitting to make one pump do it all you would only saved a few dollars anyways.  Go with a 2 pump setup. Start with 4 batterys. This are about $25 a piece for Interstate. And now to answer a few questions in your post...

Pumps- The difference in pumphead sizes are the amount of fluid that they can move. Pumps consist of the following parts: Motor- turns the pump, Pumphead- moves the fluid, Resevoir- stores and collects the fluid. Block- holds all the parts together and directs the fluid. Attached to the pump assemble you have other parts depending on setup. Main components are fittings, dumps- releases the pressue to the cylinders, checkvalves- allows the fluid to only move in one direction, slow downs- to control the speed of how fast the car drops, and y-block(used on one dump setups, such as hopper)- takes the output for one cylinder and makes it into two . A pump with two dumps can control two cylinders down motion. You will have to pump up both (say front) cylinders then the dumps can control which side you want to go down.

Solenoids- They take the sudden power spike when you hit the switch and delivers it to the pump. It can handle a lot higher voltage than the switch and that is why it is needed. Also, serves as the power interupt to the pump until you hit the switch otherwise your pump would run constantly.

With a basic setup your technical problems are going to be at a minimum. Solenoids go out from to much power for the amount of them or poor grounds. Leaks occur from improper tighting, no teflon tape on fittings, or blowing seals from pressure.

You got a lot to learn, but these are the basics of what compents are used. Installing and learning the placements are another story. Save up your money and do it right the first time. Hell if your anywhere close to where I live drive on over and I would be glad help you out. For $800 to a G you should be sitting good and have all you need.
where do you buy battery's for $25? everywhere i go there like $60 to $100[/b][/quote]
Unless your doing a show car, ask the battery dealer about blems! They are always cheaper! ;)
 

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Originally posted by sneakyboy1@Sep 19 2003, 09:56 AM
where do you buy battery's for $25? everywhere i go there like $60 to $100

Unless your doing a show car, ask the battery dealer about blems! They are always cheaper! ;)
[/quote]
True. We get batteries from Interstate, they are the remans (remanufactured-all black). Most people use these and they work just as well as most other batteries out there. however there is better looking and better. I been running a set of 8 in one car for almost 2 years without replacing any. We can get them for about $20-$25 our cost, since we buy so many for all the cars we do and own.

Note: battery life will be greatly affected by the way you charge them. You can buy $100 batteries, but if you charge them wrong they will go to shit just as fast as any other battery out there. A slow trickle charge is best, try avoid doing high amp charges.
 
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