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Originally posted by The Modeling Pimp@Dec 2 2003, 05:56 PM
i need ALOT of help

i cant figure out what im doin wrong
it looks like shit
any tips or suggestions?
I first paint the part the color the flocking will be and let it dry.
Next I put down some clear ( some guys use plain old elmers white glue ) Sprinkle the flocking on, I hear if you sift it through a screen it covers more evenly. Gently press down the flocking , turn your part over and shake the loose stuff onto a sheet of paper so you can put it back in the container
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Originally posted by dag65+Dec 2 2003, 07:01 PM--></span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (dag65 @ Dec 2 2003, 07:01 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteBegin--The Modeling Pimp@Dec 2 2003, 05:56 PM
i need ALOT of help

i cant figure out what im doin wrong
it looks like shit
any tips or suggestions?
I first paint the part the color the flocking will be and let it dry.
Next I put down some clear ( some guys use plain old elmers white glue ) Sprinkle the flocking on, I hear if you sift it through a screen it covers more evenly. Gently press down the flocking , turn your part over and shake the loose stuff onto a sheet of paper so you can put it back in the container[/b][/quote]
well im doin that cept a do it when the paint is wet :(
i let it sit fo bout 1 minute then shake the stuff off

its all lumpy and bumpy lookin
 

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when I apply my flocking, I paint it, then put on some elmers glue, then put the flocking really thick. Give the glue plenty of time to completely dry, then I use my finger and rub off what ever doesnt stick, works great for me. Nice and even so far.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Originally posted by lukedogg@Dec 2 2003, 07:19 PM
when I apply my flocking, I paint it, then put on some elmers glue, then put the flocking really thick. Give the glue plenty of time to completely dry, then I use my finger and rub off what ever doesnt stick, works great for me. Nice and even so far.
u or anybody have pics of flock jobs they have done?
 

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I have had good luck with Elmers. The trick is to thin it out with a cpl drops of water & mix it all up with a toothpick. I've also heard that that testors windshield glue works well. It's already thin enough where you don't have to mix it. I've never tried acrylic paint, but I've known some people to say it dries too quick. Another good way to keep it clumping up is to sift it. I have an old salt shaker that has been working well, especially if your working with anything other than Ken's. < Easily the best!

Hope this helps,
 

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ok Matt, i found it. This is copied word for word from the OWNER of scale dreams. so if anyone agrees or disagrees this isnt mine it is from a very well known model builder.


"This tip came from a very good friend who does the best flocking of model car interiors that I have ever seen (including my own)! He Writes:"


"I know a lot of people may be intimidated by flocking, but there is a very easy way that gives excellent results! I have had excellent luck using Model Master flat enamel paint that closely matches the color of the flocking being used. I use the enamel paint because it dries slower than the acrylic equivalents and provides more time for the flocking to adhere. With a wide brush, liberally apply the paint to small sections of the interior using the natural seams and humps of the interior as stopping points. To prevent the flocking from clumping, use spice jars or salt shakers (tea strainers also work well) and sift a heavy amount of flocking over the painted area. Do not touch the flocking until it has dried completely. Once the paint has dried, shake off the excess flocking and return it to the container. Work over an empty model box or a large piece of clean white paper or poster board so that the excess can be easily contained and returned to the container for future use. That's all there is to it! To me, flocking is the most important part of a well detailed interior. Its also one of the easiest, least expensive detailing steps you can take!

To this hint I would like to add:

I use this method myself and have obtained great results! One of the main complaints I hear about g flocking is that the area under tends to show through. That's the reason for applying the flocking over paint rather than glue. Its also important that only flat paints be used. Who ever heard of shiny carpet? Although enamels do work better than acrylics, there are some colors of flocking for which there are no enamel colors readily available. For these colors, you can find matching colors for most shades of flocking at any craft store (including Wal-Mart). Just go to the craft and fabric department and look for fabric paints! These come in a wide variety of colors, and are flat. Just use them the same as enamel, only work on smaller areas!

One other thing. Even doing this exactly right you will still occasionally get areas where the flocking does not cover as well as you might like. NO PROBLEM! Just wait until the first coat of paint is completely dry, and then repeat the process! "
 

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Discussion Starter #13
THANK YOU SO MUCH! ;) ;) ;)

i have to pick up a strainer tomorrow and a lil bit of light blue paint ;)



Last edited by The Modeling Pimp at Dec 2 2003, 08:42 PM
 

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i didnt read all of this. so if some said it sorry for the repeat.

i find a flat kolor that is very close to it. paint the area(s) where the flocking is going on. i used skool glue str8 from the bottle. i use a wide brush to spread the glue around. then i get the flocking a spread the flocking thick and all over. then i press in the flocking. after it drys, remove all the xtra flocking. after that i get a the hand of the paint brush or the back oft the xato knife and scrape the loose hairs

this only takes 2-3 min.....if that

and if you fuck up just soak the part in water, and the glue with flocking will come off.
 

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I've never even tried using that Flocking, Fuzzy Fur stuff, maybe I will now that I know how it's done. Thanks for sharing the info. :thumbsup:



Last edited by ScratchBuilderV at Dec 3 2003, 11:23 AM
 

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Originally posted by The Modeling Pimp@Dec 2 2003, 06:04 PM


its all lumpy and bumpy lookin
thats why I said it helps to sift it through a screen or like the article mad posted use a spice jar to shake it on.
Good luck
 

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I did some last night using some watered down craft glue called "Tacky Glue" from Michaels, laid on smoother than Elmer's. I use a little strainer too, using the other end of the brush that I put the glue with to work it around in the strainer.

I tried using acrylics, but it dried to fast. You have to water glue down or else it will have to much surface tension and draw into itself. The consistency has to be just right so it will cover.

K. Diaz
 

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Theres also this stuff in a can that your sapose to use for flocking... its a colored glue (different color glue for different color flock)that you apply with a paint brush, after you apply to can sprinkle it on and just tap it with your fingure and it will never come off or bubble up... ill see if i can get the name of the brand of glue tomarra
 
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