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probably.

The easiest way to rate a amp is this:

Check out the total amperage in fuses the amp is rated to handle, then multiply that number by 5 and by 7. Then you get the RMS wattage of the amp. This is possible on all amps (minus the block amplifiers) because of the physical limitations of teh electronics.

For example:

Amp "A" claims 3000W MAX (so thereotically it would be 1500W rms) .

ITs total fuse amperage is (2 x 25A fuses)

So 50A * 5 = 250WRMS

No where near the rated numbers.

This is because the manufacturers rate their amps differently. Boss rates 3000W @ 8 ohms @ 3500 hz, who the hell can play 3500 hz through a true subwoofer? no one can, thus you arent getting your moneys worth.

Answer your q?
 

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all of the above is true.....also the laws dont apply to car audio...on home audio the amplifiers must push what they say they push...not so on car audio....usually the more expensive the amp the more they actually push...because they underrate their amps...check out the jbl 1200.1 i think is the model number......good amp for the money
 

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yeah.. I second the jbl... I plan on picking one up next month after I get rid of my bd1000...

Amperage x Current X Efficiency = RMS

for example, my bd1000 is 100amps, 13.9v x 75% effecient and it produces 1042.5 watts rms at full tilt... which is at a 2 ohm load. but you also have to take into account that you won't be getting a constant voltage unless you have a shitload of batteries, or a really powerful alt with a nice electrical system.. most of the time you will experience voltage drops...

the above equation is really nice to see if an amp will really put out rated power... a more exact way is to bench test it..
 
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