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as you can tell, i dont know sh*t about speakers. any explanation would be useful.

one thing that kinda gets me also is say if i buy some 8 ohm woffers; can they be wired up to be 1/2 ohm or 2 ohm? what is the benefit to different ohms?

what if i have some speakers that are 400 watts RMS, and 1000 watt total? does it mean that 400 watts is what the woofer needs to make it play at its max potential? is more watts than 500 too much for it, and will it then distort? if i put 1000+ watts to it, does it mean that thats their limit thus they will more than likely, blow out?
 

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Id like to learn about the whole schematics behind ohms myself, but I can answer your question about power output...
RMS is the recommended playing level that your sub should be played at, so basically, you could ride around at 400w all day because that is its normal playing level... max power is the maximum output for the sub. It should only be played up that high for sound blurps, it isnt a recommended playing level because the sub will most likely blow if played too long at that level... You gotta remember that some companies are under rated and others are over rated, so you should learn the real capabilities of your equipment through graph and test sheets
 

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RMS=Root means squared

Its the average actual voltage (or the effective voltage) seen from an AC waveform (sine wave). Music (subwoofer) is in AC waveforms. (sine waves)

Your wall outlet is 120V AC RMS. Actually, it is 170V AC peak. Nobody goes by the peak value because its not the "average".

If u took a meter and measured your wall outlet it would say 120V AC because it measures RMS. If u took an oscilloscope and measured it, the peak of the sign wave would be at 170V AC.

Power ratings in WATTS work in a similar way, but are/can also be deceiving.
 

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As far as the ohms go, subs are designed with different ohm loads for different sub/amp configurations. The ohm load is the resistance that the sub places on the amp. If the load drops too low, the amp will try to put out more power than it can handle. There are many tutorials that you can find onthe internet, but I'll go over the most common designs.
Most people get two 8 ohm subs to bridge to a single amp. If you parallel them (+ to + and - to -) it creates a 4 ohm load. If you have a sub with dual 4 ohm voice coils, you can parallel the coils to get a 2 ohm load. If you series the coils (one of the coil's + to the other's - and then run the remaining leads to the amp) you get an 8 ohm load. You usually do this when you want to bridge a pair of these subs to a single amp.
All you need to remember is that for most aplications, you don't want to bridge an amp with less than a 4 ohm load unless you are sure that it is designed for that.
 
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